Why Piyush Pandey is the greatest Indian Ad-man ever? Why he deserves the “Clio” life time?


This is from my previous post, posted a couple of years back when Piyush was conferred “life time achievement award” by AAAI and now “Clio” announced that its going to honor our man, and I truly believe there is no person more deserving in the world advertising then him ( including Marcello Serpa.)

Excerpts from my previous post:

Piyush Pandey was recently been conferred AAAI lifetime achievement award, an honor usually reserved for retirees. Piyush is still a practicing creative person in short a working legend. He is Indian advertising’s greatest, I will place him above Subhas Ghosal, Alyque Padamsee and Mohammed Khan for simple reasons: he single-handedly changed the target audience from elite British Indians to middle class heartland bharatvasi’s. And also for putting Indian advertising amongst the global greats. (I had the privilege of working with all the above legends except Piyush.)

Above all he is one of the greatest human beings I have met in my career, what can you say? In this pseudo advertising and corporate world, where people hesitate to thank there wife for being an inspiration and support in public, this man brings his mother to the ceremony and proudly introduces her to all honchos present. I always admired people who do not hesitate to show respect for parents and family in public. I can not think of any other Ad-man doing that.

Piyush is a large-hearted man, loves his life enjoys every moment with a hearty laughter. I have never seen him crib about anything. This is what gets reflected in his work and also in his agency, always enjoys and celebrate life. As we at Burnett believe that “creativity has the power to transform human behavior” Piyush showered enough creativity to change the way common people behaved in this country, right from “Luna” finding a place in middle class India to nation celebrating the success of “Pappu” with Cadbury Dairy Milk to Railgaddi for Indian railways to celebrating real life characters in Fevicol.

He changed the way Indians looked at advertising, he had created many stars, gave new vocabulary, made people love advertising more than television programming. I can go on and on as an insider what he had done to the Industry and why he deserved the award and this blog.

Why do we miss our middle-class-ness?



Somewhere down the lane, without you realizing success changes your life. While success\money\technology brings lots of new excitement, experiences fulfilling newer needs and desires, it also reduces lot of joys of middle-class life to memories of the past.

Hear are a few middle-class moments we all deeply miss:

Sharing ill-fitted cloths of your elder brother as a kid\teenager. However much you resist it had to happen for expensive terrycot or terlene shirts or even ever lasting Bata shoes. We virtually had to drag feet on rough concrete roads to make rubber burn and make holes in the shoes to get newer one’s or to stop passing on to our younger brothers.

All the siblings to share the same design and fabric for every festival courtesy family tailor who brings a “tann” at a cheaper rate.

Advance booking of textbooks from a friendly neighborhood senior student, if you do not have an elder brother or sister studying in the same school.

How could you escape the Nepaliwalla’s sweater for winters or your mom’s ill-knitted one, which became loose and two sizes bigger to your younger brother after three months of use or abuse?

Coconut oil and Shikakai “Head-bath” is a ritual for every festival and auspicious day in our childhood. Oily head was fine since it’s done on holidays but shikakai homemade shampoo used to burn the eyes and made them red for a day at the least.

Listening to radio cricket commentary and keeping detailed scorecard, not to mention the suffering from Narotham Puri. And of course the ting tongs of “Vividh bharathi “

An excuse of stomach aches to get free taste of Unani medicine.

Homemade Kulfi, sweets and even Diwali crackers, watching adults make firecrackers at home was the most amazing sight of excitement and stealing them while drying was even more exciting.

Life on a terraces is a chapter by itself starting from combined studies to leching girls to sleeping on the terrace in summer nights to family night outs to endless “Antakshari” sessions to stealing “drying vadams & cut mango pieces.

The very best of cheap and best mentality, repair and reuse, make it at home, homemade remedies v/s specialty clinics, Mom & Dads always use to find innovative ways to fulfill needs without spending much money and this very sprits of parents is vanishing very quickly.

I thank my parents, grand parents and my brothers for giving me such a wonderful and humane middle=class-way of life.

Being Pops.


What the heck if pretty girls call me Pops? What’s the fuch if people think I was born in the same year as Zora Sehgal ? What the hell if people try to find similarities between Balki, and me thinking that I am his Pops? What the shet if Arvind Sharma’s driver introduces me as his saheb’s “papaji” ?

It’s not easy being Pops. Yes. It’s not easy to be Big B’s Popsji, Chennai’s Mr.Pops, Miss Universe Sushmita Sen’s Pops, Chiranjeevi’s Pops garu, Balki’s Pops & Tweetaratti’s kvpops. “Baap re” its difficult to take loads of affection, respect and love.

“Pops” made Kondiparthi Venkata Sridhar a brand, and proved to the world, power of naming and branding. Imagine Mr. kondiparthiji.  What did I do to deserve to be called Pops?

Simply nothing.

In early 90’s when Chax and I joined Lintas as creative heads of one of their Bombay units, Alyque Padamsee was at his wittiest best when he hired an ex- military Major as chief administrator. Now one can imagine the hierarchy and bureaucracy ruling the floors of Express towers.

In such an office there was a quite shy-ish six-foot young copywriter named Sridhar existed. Since the culture did not allow bosses to be nicknamed, poor little baby-faced Sridhar was christened as “Baby Sridhar” and me, months later by default became “Papa Sridhar” and then came a livewire called Asha Rishi an account executive who started calling me Pops.

By virtue of my personality people felt it’s an apt description of me. Chax my partner in crime need to take some blame for not resenting in fact he started a chain of jokes on Pops. Around mid 90’s advertising and marketing media suddenly became big and they took up the mission of making Pops stick in people’s heads.

In old day advertising guys used be real characters with some quirkiness, Alyque with his diction, Kersy with his suspenders, Chax with his Gandhi glass and signature beard, Piyush with his handlebar mustache, Prahlad with his cigars and hat, since I had none, “Pops” helped me to be remembered.

All jokes apart, the changes that came along with the name Pops are: made me look wiser, acquire patience, forced me to listen to people and lend my shoulder, made me stop leching at young girls once they call you Pops. Convinced me to adopt young talented kids and above all reminds me to make my bucket list every morning.

As the cliché’ goes: the rest is history.

( Written specially for Impact magazine.)

Story of a tail wagging the dog.


Advertising time dictating cricketing time.

Many years back my partner Chax used to have a poster in his office, which read as follows: ” If you do not find space on the floor then use the ash-trey.” the same sounds true to Indian cricket broadcasting  ” if you do not find ad spots then run live cricket.”

Strange isn’t it. Being an advertising person to hate ads in a cricket telecast, point is not my obsession for cricket; in fact it’s for advertising. People who watch cricket are passionate about cricket and they are mature enough to know the role of ad revenue in cricket broadcasting, it is when ad spots cross the line, it’ gets destructively irritating and broadcasters have been doing this consistently last couple of years. Who will lose in this? Viewer, broadcaster or the advertiser?

I guess you do not have to be a genius to figure out that the advertisers are going to lose out for annoying the viewers and loosing ethical and emotional stature with the viewer/ consumers therefore lose certain emotional equity of the brand advertised. It’s like an irritating pet throwing ball at you urging you to play when you are making love to a women.

I appeal to all my dear clients not to make their ads work against them by placing in an over booked slots and to my dear media planners not to get carried away by the TRP’s and OTS, please also keep in mind brand values and look at people in the context of cricket passion this session.

Leave the dog to do the rest.

Partnerships.


When I got married and moved to Bangalore my 70-year-old landlord and his 65-year-old wife were waiting for us at the bungalow we hired to bless us. My one week old wife was happy that a couple who were married for over 40 years are blessing us.

Little we knew that the secret they were about to share would change our lives. The couple asked us “who’s decision was it to move to Bangalore?” I gleamingly said 50:50 pointing both of us. The couple took us aside and shared the secret: “ Partnership is not about being 50:50, it’s to know when to be 30 and when to be 70.”

Like in life even at work this principle works brilliantly. Good partnerships thrive on pushing each other and to know when to push and when not to. Like spouses, partners do not have to be politically correct or worry about emotions at that point in time.


Such successful partnerships in advertising in India are: Chax & Pops (me). Piyush Pandey & Sonal Debral, Neville & Josy Paul, Naveed & Freddy, late Mahesh & Rajiv and now Aggi & Paddy.

Forging a partnership allows you to have mutual trust and respect, I have had forged many in my career which helped me in creating iconic work apart from Chax the significant ones are with Balki at Lowe, Agnello at Lowe and leo Burnett, Arvind Sharma & Rajeev Sharma at Leo Burnett, Ramathkar started at Enterprise in 90’s and still continuing, Ganesh Mahalingam at LG. Dharen Chedda at JWT.

Partnerships are like friendships: “selfless” all the time, this allows you to accept any criticism or ideas with equal enthusiasm. Usually we think clients, bosses, celebrity filmmakers and film and sports stars are monsters and are out to get your life like “Yamdharmaraj”, which is fortunately not true.

Ganesh Mahalingam of LG used to approve scripts on phone and sms’s which allowed us to create over 50 commercials in a calendar year to take the brand LG over 3000 corers. Look at Rajiv Rao and Varma their partnership is creating magic for their band and consumers, Piyush & Prasoon created magic on Fevicol as siblings often do. Balki’s partnership with Amitabh Bachchan  is proving to be as potent as Saleem & Javeed of 70’s.

Partnerships can also help in strange ways as Balki’s youth did to me; I had difficult time to match up to his energy levels. No wonder people say never marry a girl half your age…

Now that I stand exposed of my crimes and partners. Amen.

“Famous brands make creatives famous.”


Young creative people often shy away from working on big brands, it is becoming extremely difficult to attract good talent to work on country’s biggest brands. The reason being: You have to work with-in a given box, younger ones wants the freedom to think freely and fit brands to their ideas than the other way round. The discipline of brief, research and listening to consumers/ people is too much of a bore these days to youngsters. I like the freshness and energy youth brings to the table but hate the indiscipline which tags along.

There are few reasons why young creatives should work on big brands:

  1. Piyush: Cadbury’s, Fevicol, Luna, SBI, Ponds, Asian Paints and Perfetti
  2. Balki: Pepsodent, Fair & Lovely, Surf, Idea and Bajaj
  3. Prasoon Joshi: Coca Cola, Perfetti-Happydent
  4. Agnello Dias: Rin, Thums Up, Nike, Sony, Indian Oil and Times of India
  5. Rajiv Rao: Hutch, Vodafone and Zoo zoo’s.
  6. Madhu Bhandari: Fair & Lovely, Pepsodent, J
  7. Priti Nair: Axe, Balbir Pasha, Clinic, Surf and Green Ply
  8. Ravi Deshpande : Cadbury’s, Shoppers Shop and Asian Paints
  9. Chax: Brooke Bond, J&J, Airtel, Docomo and Indian Oil
  10. Abhajit Awasti : Cadbury’s, ITC, Asian Paints, Limca, Sprite and Perfetti.

Imagine if these legends were not to work on the brands they worked. would they be as famous as they are today? Big brands give you big canvas and big bucks. What else you need to be famous?. All these humble creative people ( I have known all of them for several decades now) have given there lives and have sacrificed personal time to work on big brands and I guarantee you they have the same appetite even today.

It’s a wonderful feeling when you see the brands you worked on are the brands people love and you have a little part in making them lovable.