“Ganesh” most loved god by people. And most fascinated by artist.


Today Hindus celebrate the festival of “Ganesh Chaturti”, where Lord Ganesh was made head of all deities by his father Lord Shiva, religion apart, Ganesh the half elephant- half human, short, fat and has rat (rodent) as his vehicle is the most loved god in India, he cuts across all religious and physical boundaries. In Bangkok or Barampur  no business is conducted without worshiping him, similarly there is no child in the sub-continent who can not draw Ganesha. His physical appearance and his stature as god of gods and his victory over his smart brother made him as an identifiable hero with kids. And growing up with this affinity is what makes him the favorite amongst the creative people. Like kids there is no poet, writer, painter or a caricaturist who had not dabbled with this lovable god’s image. Great painters right from Raja Ravi Varma to M F Hussain all were fascinated by him which is evident from their work.

The greatest contribution to Lord Ganesha came from the much celebrated Calendar art of Shivakasi a small town in Tamilnadu. Today Shivakasi is the second largest printing capital of the world only after Gutenberg of Germany what started as a backyard litho printing units of British India, developed into rich hindu calendar art/ film poster studios to present day offset.

As a child I used to make clay Ganesha for the festival celebrations, now my daughter follows the tradition.

“Anna” the ultimate HumanKind brand.


How did this 74 year old caught the imagination of Indian youth and made them rally around a 60-year-old bill and a 5000-year-old issue?

Why did loads of tweet-support flood every nano-second of the agitation?

Why did the most powerful television channel go on a record 240 hours of non-stop coverage almost converting news as a reality channel?

Why did I change my Facebook profile picture?

Why did the opposition party go numb?

What made the seasoned politicians make such political blunders?

The answer is simple. “Anna found a purpose to his existence.”

It took years even for Mahatma Gandhi to find a purpose to his existence; lesser mortals like us may not even find one in our lifetime.

Anna discovery of his purpose and mission took the country by surprise, his timing was flawless, scams and toothless actions paved way for his massive and historic modern-day civilian movement in the world’s largest democracy.

People were angry to see the audacity of the corrupt politicians, businessmen, and religious leaders and shameless public display of money in building mansions. A trillion dollars locked in the locker rooms of Swiss banks and toilets of government quarters’, the economic progress stopped to start an economic exploitation.

Clearly someone crossed the line.

Anna’s purpose of “fighting against corruption” caught the imagination of a billion victims. And his stubborn Gandhian and his humble & honest ways attracted people like little iron fillings to a magnet. He was a mere catalyst to a huge chemical reaction destine to happen.

Now what can brands learn from this? Like great human beings find a purpose to their lives, even brands must find a human purpose to find a place in people’s lives as Anna’s life is governed by his purpose to serve the nation, even brands must be governed by its purpose. And finally must walk the talk.

As Mahatma Gandhi says “An ounce of practice is worth more than tons of preaching.”

“Airwaves belong to the people”


India might be the oldest and the most successful democracy in the world but it’s really the last decade, which empowered people. As the social media and Internet revolutionized the way people lived and behaved in this country. Its media which empowered the people from Tehelka to the resent CWG exposures to Mumbai blast coverage to ugly money display in parliament to cricket scandals to reality shows to pink chaddies to meter jams, by making public opinion count, aam admi is the king today decides who can do what and when and how.

This is the beginning of  “Democracy 2.0”. Empowered by 650 million mobile phones loaded with FM radio’s and over 200 million traditional radio sets new revolution is about to begin in the real India from an unexpected medium called Radio.

What Facebook and Twitter are doing to urban India, radio can do to rural India, only if the government were to wake up and allow community radio to spread like wildfire.

Pandit Nehru put pressure on radio to help in “Social modernization” of independent India.  How true? Social modernization can only be achieved by debate and exchange of ideas between people, every revolution in the modern world used radio to propagate and influence people to their ideologies including Netaji Bose.

Linguistic diversity is never been respected as mush as it should in India, we have always looked at India as three-language nation: Hindi, English and Tamil. What can we do to a country where a dialect changes every 24 kms? Radio might just be the answer.

Can “Akashvani” become “Prajavani”?

Growth in real India is for real now.



Emerging economies are providing the growth to the world GDP than the developed ones is a fact known to all. In fact it’s the emerging markets who miraculously helped the recovery of the world economy. Ditto is true to India, while urban markets are saturated like the developed ones its the rural markets which have become the growth engines in many a sectors. FMCG to Automobiles to Durables to Telecom every sector is looking towards the hinterland.

With 20% plus growth in FMCG, Unilever is believed to be investing heavily by recruiting rural sales force and by increasing retail presence, according to a recent report DTH sales contribution from rural is as high as 60%, talk to any marketer the same story. What does all this mean? are we prepared to this shift of consumer mindset?

Sheer change in numbers are mind-boggling from a mere 200 million urban middle class to almost 700 million heartland’s new consumer class. The stimulus package for rural employment which is close to $8.5 billion is what I believe is doing the trick. For the first time in independent India’s history government is really infusing money into rural system. In next couple of years you will witness real India emerging with gigantic consumption, to illustrate whats in store; look at the rural BPO’s in Tamilnadu and Andhra Pradesh which are significantly cheaper because of low overheads and infrastructure cost.  Now look at the economic and consumption impact of education sector’s growth. What “Bangalore” did to urban India is what “Kizhanur village” is going to do to rural India.

In short education and employment with infusion of money by government is bridging the gap between the villages and cities. Imagine 700 million mobile phones ringing at the same time, and now imagine the cash registers..

The pace at which life in a smaller town is changing is unbelievable, young guys are the changing agents powered with education, a mobile phone connection and exposure to big city ambitions are influencing the mindset of elders. This changing India is difficult to understand as this India is diverse and deep.